Ryby love story

Scott Walker is amazing and here's why

2019.04.15 22:55 ToDeathYouSay Scott Walker is amazing and here's why

Here's how I got into Scott Walker. It all started with Jacques Brel. Let me explain. While studying French in university, I used to listen to (and "sing" along with) Jacques Brel, this old 1960s French singer. He just had this crazy appeal: the pathos of Ne me quitte pas, the poetry of La Chanson Des Vieux Amants and Sans Exigences, the fascinating 1960s music video of Je Suis Un Soir d'Ete, and the complete French-ness of Vesoul.
I loved the stories of Orly, Jef, and Jojo. I think what I loved was his stage persona, as seen in this live version of Les Vieux or D'Amsterdam. He had this amazing voice and serious yet vulnerable demeanor, and behind it all he has this amazing worldview that comes out through his songwriting: all qualities that Scott Walker had.
One college day, my work-study manager handed me a CD he had burned (yes it was 2004) of songs by a guy named Scott Walker. He knew I liked Jacques Brel, and he thought I would like these songs. He liked Scott Walker because Scott Walker appeared on BBC with Dusty Springfield and sang Let It Be Me.
Anyway, I listened to every song side-by-side the original Jacques Brel. It was fascinating how some were near-direct translations and some were more "poetic interpretations". There are SO many songs by Jacques Brel that Scott Walker covered.
Brel Walker
Fils de Sons of
Amsterdam Amsterdam
La Chanson de Jacky Jacky
My Death La Mort
Amsterdam Amsterdam
Au Suivant Next
Ne Me Quitte Pas If You Go Away
Le Tango Funebre The Funeral Tango
Mathilde Mathilde
This last one is my favorite. It did not appear on the album--it's emotional. It's about fame. It's about loneliness.
Brel: Seul
Walker: Alone
Let's pivot away from Scott and Jacques
After I listened to all of Scott's Brel covers, I started to sift through his other work. He first became famous with his band The Walker Brothers. They were not brothers. This was their most famous song: it's pleasant; it almost showcases Scott's voice. But it really introduced him a front-man, a teen idol, heart-throb. Something he never wanted to be...
Scott never named his first 4 albums; he numbered them.
His first album "Scott" (1967) was mostly Brel covers.
His second album "Scott 2" (1968) sees him start to come into his own with the 6-minute "Plastic Palace People." But you can see his songwriter-side come out in "The Bridge."
His third album "Scott 3" (1969) is when he really starts to flex his song-writing muscles. Just listen to the first 10 seconds of Big Louise. Who starts a song with a gong? Honestly.... Anyway, all 3 of those albums contain Brel covers. But it isn't until Scott 4 that Walker really hits his stride (apologies for the pun).
His fourth album "Scott 4" (1969) starts off with a song-tribute to Ingmar Bergman's The Seventh Seal, but it's the song Boy Child that really encapsulates his singer-songwriter abilities.
Fast Forward 10 years
In 1979, the Walker Brother release the album Nite Flights, which David Bowie credits as one of his inspirations. The song "The Electrician" is a melodic but terrifying piece of rock-electronica: way ahead of its time.
This song makes so much more sense when I listen to his 1995 album Tilt or his 2006 album The Drift.
Of his later work, 1995's Farmer in the City is eminently listenable. 2006's Clara and Psoriatic are experimental and difficult.
I think 2012's Bish Bosh is when Scott finally blendedhis unique musical vision with palatable melodies. For example, I enjoyed Epizootics.
The End
That's my history with Scott Walker. I hope anyone who reads this gains some insight and appreciation. Please, let me know if you have any questions.
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2019.04.15 22:44 ToDeathYouSay How I got into Scott Walker

Here's how I got into Scott Walker. It all started with Jacques Brel. Let me explain. While studying French in university, I used to listen to (and "sing" along with) Jacques Brel, this old 1960s French singer. He just had this crazy appeal: the pathos of Ne me quitte pas, the poetry of La Chanson Des Vieux Amants and Sans Exigences, the fascinating 1960s music video of Je Suis Un Soir d'Ete, and the complete French-ness of Vesoul.
I loved the stories of Orly, Jef, and Jojo. I think what I loved was his stage persona, as seen in this live version of Les Vieux or D'Amsterdam. He had this amazing voice and serious yet vulnerable demeanor, and behind it all he has this amazing worldview that comes out through his songwriting: all qualities that Scott Walker had.
One college day, my work-study manager handed me a CD he had burned (yes it was 2004) of songs by a guy named Scott Walker. He knew I liked Jacques Brel, and he thought I would like these songs. He liked Scott Walker because Scott Walker appeared on BBC with Dusty Springfield and sang Let It Be Me.
Anyway, I listened to every song side-by-side the original Jacques Brel. It was fascinating how some were near-direct translations and some were more "poetic interpretations". There are SO many songs by Jacques Brel that Scott Walker covered.
Brel Walker
Fils de Sons of
Amsterdam Amsterdam
La Chanson de Jacky Jacky
My Death La Mort
Amsterdam Amsterdam
Au Suivant Next
Ne Me Quitte Pas If You Go Away
Le Tango Funebre The Funeral Tango
Mathilde Mathilde
This last one is my favorite. It did not appear on the album--it's emotional. It's about fame. It's about loneliness.
Brel: Seul
Walker: Alone
Let's pivot away from Scott and Jacques
After I listened to all of Scott's Brel covers, I started to sift through his other work. He first became famous with his band The Walker Brothers. They were not brothers. This was their most famous song: it's pleasant; it almost showcases Scott's voice. But it really introduced him a front-man, a teen idol, heart-throb. Something he never wanted to be...
Scott never named his first 4 albums; he numbered them.
His first album "Scott" (1967) was mostly Brel covers.
His second album "Scott 2" (1968) sees him start to come into his own with the 6-minute "Plastic Palace People." But you can see his songwriter-side come out in "The Bridge."
His third album "Scott 3" (1969) is when he really starts to flex his song-writing muscles. Just listen to the first 10 seconds of Big Louise. Who starts a song with a gong? Honestly.... Anyway, all 3 of those albums contain Brel covers. But it isn't until Scott 4 that Walker really hits his stride (apologies for the pun).
His fourth album "Scott 4" (1969) starts off with a song-tribute to Ingmar Bergman's The Seventh Seal, but it's the song Boy Child that really encapsulates his singer-songwriter abilities.
Fast Forward 10 years
In 1979, the Walker Brother release the album Nite Flights, which David Bowie credits as one of his inspirations. The song "The Electrician" is a melodic but terrifying piece of rock-electronica: way ahead of its time.
This song makes so much more sense when I listen to his 1995 album Tilt or his 2006 album The Drift.
Of his later work, 1995's Farmer in the City is eminently listenable. 2006's Clara and Psoriatic are experimental and difficult.
I think 2012's Bish Bosh is when Scott finally blended his unique musical vision with palatable melodies. For example, I enjoyed Epizootics.
The End
That's my history with Scott Walker. I hope anyone who reads this gains some insight and appreciation. Please, let me know if you have any questions.
submitted by ToDeathYouSay to scottwalker [link] [comments]


2019.04.15 22:32 ToDeathYouSay Scott Walker is amazing, and it all starts with Jacques Brel

Here's how I got into Scott Walker, so I might be biased. It all started with Jacques Brel. Let me explain. While studying French in university, I used to listen to (and "sing" along with) Jacques Brel, this old 1960s French singer. He just had this crazy appeal: the pathos of Ne me quitte pas, the poetry of La Chanson Des Vieux Amants and Sans Exigences, the fascinating 1960s music video of Je Suis Un Soir d'Ete, and the complete French-ness of Vesoul.
I loved the stories of Orly, Jef, and Jojo. I think what I loved was his stage persona, as seen in this live version of Les Vieux or D'Amsterdam. He had this amazing voice and serious yet vulnerable demeanor, and behind it all he has this amazing worldview that comes out through his songwriting: all qualities that Scott Walker had.
One college day, my work-study manager handed me a CD he had burned (yes it was 2004) of songs by a guy named Scott Walker. He knew I liked Jacques Brel, and he thought I would like these songs. He liked Scott Walker because Scott Walker appeared on BBC with Dusty Springfield and sang Let It Be Me.
Anyway, I listened to every song side-by-side the original Jacques Brel. It was fascinating how some were near-direct translations and some were more "poetic interpretations". There are SO many songs by Jacques Brel that Scott Walker covered.
Brel Walker
Fils de Sons of
Amsterdam Amsterdam
La Chanson de Jacky Jacky
My Death La Mort
Amsterdam Amsterdam
Au Suivant Next
Ne Me Quitte Pas If You Go Away
Le Tango Funebre The Funeral Tango
Mathilde Mathilde
This last one is my favorite. It did not appear on the album--it's emotional. It's about fame. It's about loneliness.
Brel: Seul
Walker: Alone
Let's pivot away from Scott and Jacques
After I listened to all of Scott's Brel covers, I started to sift through his other work. He first became famous with his band The Walker Brothers. They were not brothers. This was their most famous song: it's pleasant; it almost showcases Scott's voice. But it really introduced him a front-man, a teen idol, heart-throb. Something he never wanted to be...
*Scott never named his first 4 albums; he numbered them. *
His first album "Scott" (1967) was mostly Brel covers.
His second album "Scott 2" (1968) sees him start to come into his own with the 6-minute "Plastic Palace People." But you can see his songwriter-side come out in "The Bridge."
His third album "Scott 3" (1969) is when he really starts to flex his song-writing muscles. Just listen to the first 10 seconds of Big Louise. Who starts a song with a gong? Honestly.... Anyway, all 3 of those albums contain Brel covers. But it isn't until Scott 4 that Walker really hits his stride (apologies for the pun).
His fourth album "Scott 4" (1969) starts off with a song-tribute to Ingmar Bergman's The Seventh Seal, but it's the song Boy Child that really encapsulates his singer-songwriter abilities.
Fast Forward 10 years
In 1979, the Walker Brother release the album Nite Flights, which David Bowie credits as one of his inspirations. The song "The Electrician" is a melodic but terrifying piece of rock-electronica: way ahead of its time.
This song makes so much more sense when I listen to his 1995 album Tilt or his 2006 album The Drift.
Of his later work, 1995's Farmer in the City is eminently listenable. 2006's Clara and Psoriatic are experimental and difficult.
I think 2012's Bish Bosh is when Scott finally blendedhis unique musical vision with palatable melodies. For example, I enjoyed Epizootics.
The End
That's my history with Scott Walker. I hope anyone who reads this gains some insight and appreciation. Please, let me know if you have any questions.
submitted by ToDeathYouSay to Music [link] [comments]


2016.11.26 04:12 DonnySlime Differences between the Bens

After I got my bachelor's in Scams, I studied some of the most well known scam artists. The Kirk's, Brett Keane, and of course, Ben. I went to LaSalle Universities to study my PhD in Keanology and a PhD in Benology. Ben is an extremely complex creature with multiple different versions of the same creature. Ben is very strange as there are multiple version of the same person, but they all clash with one another. First, before I tell you the different versions of Ben, I must give you back story on this alien creature
Alien name: The Bens
Planet: Mestizo
The Bens are extremely dangerous and unpredictable. They all look the same with piercings in the same exact spot. They are ordered by a hive mind that is currently unknown, but their are suspicions that the Bens answer to an even bigger female queen by the name of Rybi. Other theories purposed are that the Bens are controlled by an even bigger Ben. Who the fuck know, but research is being conducted by Brett Keane.
Ben Gahzi
Ben Gahzi was the first to be introduced on the drunken peasants. Ben Gahzi is constantly wearing a mask and is very mysterious. Ben Gahzi was named after the incident in Benghazi. Ben Gahzi was in fact the reason why Benghazi happened and why those soldiers died. Ben Gahzi has even been caught selling nuclear weapons to the Italian Mafia. Why? I don't know. Ben Gahzi is now in hiding because of a disastrous incident in Atlantic City.
Ben Gay
Ben Gay is a faggot that suck dick as his name proves it. Ben Gay was also named after the ointment (maybe, he lathers himself with it sexually). Ben Gay shows his face with many piercings. Ben Gays first appearance was when he sexually harassed Anita Sarkeesian by taking a picture of her behind his shoulder. Ben Gay is the second most dangerous next to Ben Gahzi. Ben Gay is the greatest mma fighter of all time. Ben Gay mostly does mma, so he can roll around with sweaty men and wrap his legs around them. Ben Gay has challenged the great Brett Keane. Ben Gay has replaced Ben Gahzi.
Ben
Regular Ben is strange as he does not appear on camera. Ben controls everything off screen. He can be any of the other Bens.
Drunk Ben
Drunk Ben loves to fight people, but also, loves everyone. Drunk Ben is dyslexic and always drunk. Drunk Ben is the nicest and meanest of all the Bens.
Scammer Ben
Scammer Ben is a scammer who trucks people with Kaceytron and Rybi. Scammer Ben is a cunt.
Hockey mask Ben (aka Ben Vorhees)
Ben Vorhees is extremely rare and extremely dangerous. He is known to kill with a hockey stick.
Those are the main Bens, now fuck off.
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2015.02.19 13:49 dielectrician Anyone up for corrections? David Foster Wallace's This is Water graduation speech (not the whole thing)

Greetings ["parents"?] and congratulations to Kenyon's graduating class of 2005. There are these two young fish swimming along and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says "Morning, boys. How's the water?" And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes "What the hell is water?"
Pozdrowienia, rodzice, kongratuluję adbsolwenci klasy 2005 roku uniwersytetu Kenyon. Dwie ryby pływają spokojnie i spotkały starszą rybę pływając strony przeciwnej który pyta „cześć chłopcy, jak tam woda dżis?” A te ryby pływają trochę dalej, a ewentualnie pierwszy obrócił się do, i zapytał drugiego, „cóż to ‘woda’”?
This is a standard requirement of US commencement speeches, the deployment of didactic little parable-ish stories. The story ["thing"] turns out to be one of the better, less bullshitty conventions of the genre, but if you're worried that I plan to present myself here as the wise, older fish explaining what water is to you younger fish, please don't be. I am not the wise old fish. The point of the fish story is merely that the most obvious, important realities are often the ones that are hardest to see and talk about. Stated as an English sentence, of course, this is just a banal platitude, but the fact is that in the day to day trenches of adult existence, banal platitudes can have a life or death importance, or so I wish to suggest to you on this dry and lovely morning.
To jest standardowym wymaganiem przemówień zwołania tutaj w stanach, używanie dydaktycznych małych bajek w rodzaju przypowieści. Ta bajka okazuje się jeden z lepszych, mniej głupszych konwencji gatunku, ale jeżeli martwicie się że planuję przestawić się jako tej starszą, rozumniejszą rybą tłumacząc co woda jest do młodszych ryb, proszę, nie martwcie. Nie jest jestem starsza mądrzejsza ryba. Istotna rzecz tej bajki jest że najwidoczniejsze, najważniejsze rzeczywistości życia często są najtrudniejsze widzieć i o które rozmawiać. Przedstawiony jako zdania, to po prostu jest banałem , ale fakt jest że między codziennymi walkami egzystencji życia dorosłego, banały mogą mieć powagę życia i śmierci, lub, tylko chciałbym ci sugerować na tym suchym i wygodnym ranem.
Of course the main requirement of speeches like this is that I'm supposed to talk about your liberal arts education's meaning, to try to explain why the degree you are about to receive has actual human value instead of just a material payoff. So let's talk about the single most pervasive cliché in the commencement speech genre, which is that a liberal arts education is not so much about filling you up with knowledge as it is about "teaching you how to think". If you're like me as a student, you've never liked hearing this, and you tend to feel a bit insulted by the claim that you needed anybody to teach you how to think, since the fact that you even got admitted to a college this good seems like proof that you already know how to think. But I'm going to posit to you that the liberal arts cliché turns out not to be insulting at all, because the really significant education in thinking that we're supposed to get in a place like this isn't really about the capacity to think, but rather about the choice of what to think about. If your total freedom of choice regarding what to think about seems too obvious to waste time discussing, I'd ask you to think about fish and water, and to bracket for just a few minutes your scepticism about the value of the totally obvious.
Na pewno, głowny wymaganie przemówień jak ten, jest że powinienem rozmawiać o znaczenie waszych edukacji humanistycznych, próbować wytłumaczyć czemu dyplom który będziecie otrzymywali za chwile ma aktualna wartość zamiast po prostu finansowe, materiałowe zyski. Wieć rozmawiajmy o jedyny najpowszechniejszy frazes w gatunku przemówień zwołania, który jest że edukacji w tematach humanistycznych nie jest tak bardzo o napełnienie swoją głowę wiedzą, ale że chodzi o to żeby ci nauczyć „jak myśleć”. Jeśli jesteś studentem jak ja, nigdy nie lubiłeś to słyszeć, i obraża ci trochę roszczenie że trzeba ktokolwiek ciebie nauczyć jak to myśleć, ponieważ fakt że w ogólę byłeś przyjmowany do uniwersytetu wydaje się dowód że już wiesz jak to myśleć. Ale twierdzę że ten frazes nauki humanistycznej raczej nie jest obraźliwy, ponieważ ta bardzo znaczna nauka myślenie która powiniliśmy tu zdobyć nie jest o wydajności naszej myślenia, ale raczej jest o naszym wyboru właśnie o czym myśleć. Jeżeli wasza pełna wolność wyborów w sprawie o czym myśleć wydaje się wam za widoczna i prosta żeby dyskutować, poprosiłbym was żeby myśleć nad rybami i wodą, i żeby stłumić waszy skeptycizm wartości czegoś całkowicie widoczny.
Here's another didactic little story. There are these two guys sitting together in a bar in the remote Alaskan wilderness. One of the guys is religious, the other is an atheist, and the two are arguing about the existence of God with that special intensity that comes after about the fourth beer. And the atheist says: "Look, it's not like I don't have actual reasons for not believing in God. It's not like I haven't ever experimented with the whole God and prayer thing. Just last month I got caught away from the camp in that terrible blizzard, and I was totally lost and I couldn't see a thing, and it was 50 below, and so I tried it: I fell to my knees in the snow and cried out 'Oh, God, if there is a God, I'm lost in this blizzard, and I'm gonna die if you don't help me.'" And now, in the bar, the religious guy looks at the atheist all puzzled. "Well then you must believe now," he says, "After all, here you are, alive." The atheist just rolls his eyes. "No, man, all that was was a couple Eskimos happened to come wandering by and showed me the way back to camp."
Teraz, druga dydaktyczna bajka. Są dwaj mężczyzny siedzący razem w barze w odległa pustynia Alaski. Jeden jest wierzący, drugi ateist, i dyskutują istnienia boga, z tym ciekawą głębokość która zwykle się pojawia po cztery piwach. Ateist mówi, „to nie jest że mam jakiś specyficzne powody żeby nie wierzyć w boga. To nie jest że nigdy nie eksperymentowałem z modlitwą. Tylko miesząc temu byłem uwięziony w tym ogromnym burzy daleko z obozu. Nie mogłem widzieć niczego, było minus 50, no to spróbowałem to. Spadłem na kolanach, i krzycznąłem, „Bóg, jeżeli istniejesz, jestem zgubiony tu w tym burzy, i umrzę jeżeli mi nie ratujesz.” No i teraz, w barze, wierzący patrzę na ateista zmieszany „no to, teraz musisz wierzyć, ponieważ tu jesteś, żywy” Ateist przewrócił oczy, „Nie, to tylko było kilka Eskimosów który zdarzyli się przychodzić i pokazali mi trasę do obózu.”
*It's easy to run this story through kind of a standard liberal arts analysis: the exact same experience can mean two totally different things to two different people, given those people's two different belief templates and two different ways of constructing meaning from experience. Because we prize tolerance and diversity of belief, nowhere in our liberal arts analysis do we want to claim that one guy's interpretation is true and the other guy's is false or bad. *
Jest łatwo żeby analizować to z rodzajem standardowej analizy nauki humanistycznej. Dokładnie sam przeżycie może znaczyć dwa całkowicie inne rzeczy do dwóch innych osób, znany jak różni przekonania, i sposób zbudowania znaczenia z przeżycia. Ponieważ cenimy tolerancję i różnorodność wierzenia, nigdzie w naszej humanistycznej analizy chcemy twierdzić że jeden ma rację jego interpretacji, a drugi nie ma.
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